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Your body’s way of dealing with stress is very biological.

Let’s use a simple example:  You are walking down the street and all of a sudden the oncoming car starts to cross the yellow line and is headed right for you.  The driver is not paying attention to where the car is going and it is up to you to get out of the way of danger.  You feel this surge of energy and you jump out of the way.  The driver finally realizes that he has crossed the yellow line and quickly corrects the car's path. Now to explain, the car coming toward you is stress.  Your surge of energy, sometimes called an adrenaline rush, is your body’s reaction to that stress that allows you to get out of the way safely.

In biological terms it is all about stress and reaction.  Adrenaline is what allows us to react to stress.  Adrenaline is a hormone, but it can also act as a neurotransmitter that gives us energy on a daily basis.  The interesting thing about stress is that it has evolved.  Stress used to be instances that affected our survival like out-running a bear or stepping out of the way to avoid a car.  Now stress is bombarding us from all directions, it may be smaller stresses like getting bills paid on time, work deadlines, and family commitments, but it is constant.

Constant stress requires our bodies to constantly respond.  Responding at that rate quickly depletes our bodies and can lead to serious health problems like low mood, anxiousness, sleep difficulties and weight gain.

When your body is constantly “switched on” and it never gets the relief it needs.  This can lead to  changes in the levels of brain chemicals  called neurotransmitters.  Neurotransmitters can be measured, and with that information, we can recommend the best program for you.

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